Advanced Search

Close Search

Magnolia Grove at Greensboro, AL (ca. 1840)

Magnolia Grove, an excellent example of temple-style Greek Revival architecture, was built around 1840 as a town house by Isaac and Sarah Croom, whose plantations were about 20 miles south of Greensboro near Faunsdale. The main house and three dependencies are preserved on 15 acres. The house is a two-story masonry structure, built with bricks that were manufactured locally. The front facade is stuccoed, including the pediment. The sides and rear were left with the brick face exposed.  In 1879, the house was purchased by Sallie Pearson Hobson, a niece of Mrs. Croom. Her son, Richmond Pearson Hobson, became a naval hero during the Spanish-American War, and he later served in the United States Congress. In 1943, the Hobson family deeded Magnolia Grove to the state of Alabama to serve as a memorial to Richmond Pearson Hobson. The family members residing at Magnolia Grove at the time were granted a lifetime tenancy. Margaret Hobson continued to live in the house until her death in 1978. Magnolia Grove was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 11, 1973. It now serves as a historic house museum operated by the Alabama Historic Commission. For additional details, go to PreserveALA.org/MagnoliaGrove.

Magnolia Grove is located at the intersection of Main Street and Hobson Street in Greensboro, AL (GPS Coordinates N32.704167,W87.607500).

Source: Alabama Black Belt Nature and Heritage Trail (A publication of the Alabama Bureau of Tourism & Travel)

 

Similar Attractions

Akron Boys & Girls Club Complex at Akron, AL (a Rural Studio Project)

Most of Akron’s adults commute to Tuscaloosa or Greensboro for work which leaves the children to entertain and look after themselves for an extended period of time every day. Auburn University’s Rural Studio volunteered to design and build a Boys and Girls Club Complex with the hopes that it would provide a safe, educational alternative […]

More Info

The Drake House at Greensboro, AL (built before 1854)

The exact age of this house is not known, but it dates back well into the antebellum period.  One of the owners of this home was a Mr. Chadwick who died of yellow fever in 1854, at the age of 39.  It’s not known if he built the house. This house has a large basement […]

More Info

Hobson Bethel Methodist Church at Newbern, AL (built 1884)

The Newbern Methodist congregation selected the present site and completed this church in the fall of 1884.  (Prior to this time, they held their services in the Presbyterian Church.)  The lumber used in the construction of the church building is hand-hewn and mortised.  The walnut alter rail in the church is hand-hewn.  The pulpit and […]

More Info