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Brownstone Manor Home at Selma, AL (1898)

This neo-classic mansion was built in 1898.  This home was visited frequently by F. Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald (Fitzgerald authored “The Great Gatsby” among other American classics). In 1983, the third floor burned while being restored. Since then, it has been restored to its original beauty. It is a private home, but also hosts special events, weddings and a variety of parties.

This home is located at  330 Lapsley Street in Selma, AL (GPS coordinates N32.408139,W87.028500).

Source:  Selma’s Architecture History Tour (A Self-Guided Driving Tour)

Also, this home is said to be haunted by a previous resident of the house, Mrs. Hooper.  For details http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZXQTWrY6lc&feature=related.

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