Advanced Search

Close Search

Brownstone Manor at Selma, AL (1898)

This neo-classic mansion was built in 1898.  This home was visited frequently by F. Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald (Fitzgerald authored “The Great Gatsby” among other American classics). In 1983, the third floor burned while being restored. Since then, it has been restored to its original beauty.

This home is located at  330 Lapsley Street in Selma, AL (GPS coordinates 32.408139,-87.028500).

This is a private residence – drive by only.

Source:  Selma’s Architecture History Tour (A Self-Guided Driving Tour)

Also, this home is said to be haunted by a previous resident of the house, Mrs. Hooper.  For details http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZXQTWrY6lc&feature=related.

Similar Attractions

Selma - Grace Hall_3 (3)_qlcc(wText)-z2c800(wTewxt)

Grace Hall at Selma, AL (built c. 1857, listed on the NRHP.)

This Italianate-style house was built circa 1857. In 1865, Wilson’s Raiders spared the house out of respect for Selma’s Mayor M. J. Williams. For many years, it was a prominent bread and breakfast where former first lady Lady Bird Johnson stayed on several occasions. The house is one of several structures in Selma that was […]

More Info
Crocheron Colunms (c. 1843)

Old Cahawba Park near Selma, AL (site of Alabama’s First Capital)

Located in Dallas County southwest of Selma where the Cahaba River flows into the Alabama River, the town initially known as Cahawba served as the state’s first capital from 1820 until 1825. When the capital was moved from Cahawba in 1826 to Tuscaloosa, many of its early residents followed. With the continuing improvement of river […]

More Info
Selma - Old Depot Museum_6 (13)lc(wText)-z800

Old Depot Museum at Selma, AL (building built ca. 1890, listed on the NRHP)

The Old Depot Museum is located at the old L&N Railroad Depot at the end of historic Water Avenue in downtown Selma. The Depot building was built on the site of the Confederate Naval Foundry which was destroyed by Federal troops during the Battle of Selma in 1865.  The red brick, stone trimmed building of Romanesque […]

More Info
%d bloggers like this: